Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter

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UPDATE 03/21/15: Spotted theย Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter back in the store. Price is $17.99. Item number 537305. This is a great planter, large enough for vegetables, flowers and some trees.

Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 3Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 1

 

PUBLISHED 02/15/14: The Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter is back in the store. It was available last year as well.

Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 2

This is a nice large planter perfect for your container garden. You can plant succulents, flowers and even vegetables like lettuce in it.

Features:

– Durable and lightweight

– Weather-resistant

– Indoor and outdoor use

– 25″ W x 15″ H

Theย Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter is priced at $17.99.

Item number 537305.

Inventory and pricing at your store will vary and are subject to change at any time.

Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 4Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 3Southern Patio 25-Inch Whiskey Barrel High Density Resin Planter Costco 1

  • Dragonkist

    My hubby and I bought 5 of these planters at Costco last year because
    the garden area of our new house was not ready to plant by the time we
    moved into the place in May. Very rocky soil here in New Hampshire, so
    above ground was our only choice if we were going to get any homegrown veggies in
    2013. I drilled holes for drainage in the planter bottoms, filled the
    planters with a standard planting mix supplemented with mushroom compost
    and then planted carrots, lettuce, snap peas, peppers and arugula.
    While the weather quickly got too warm for lettuce, arugula and snap
    peas to do very well, we did get small crops even from those plants. But
    the carrots and peppers, all planted from seed, were nothing short of
    amazing!!! By fall I had harvested about 10 lbs. of peppers from just
    two plants and nearly 40 lbs. of carrots from just two pots!!! Here it
    is, nearly April of the following year, and I still have 15 lbs. of
    carrots in plastic bags in our fridge. Although our raised beds will be
    ready for planting directly this year, we’ve already purchased seven
    more of these planters from Costco to fill with extra veggie plants. The
    planters are decorative enough that we plan to place them next to the
    walk leading to our front door since that area gets more sun than our
    back yard where the raised bed veggie garden has been built. I’ll definitely grow the hot weather plants in the planters again, adding
    tomatoes, cantaloupes, cucumbers and maybe even a compact size
    watermelon plant. Gardening in these planters couldn’t be easier — very
    few weeds, not much watering needed, and a lot less bending over than
    when you plant in a regular garden. I couldn’t be happier. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Olli

      Hi Dragonkist,
      Thanks for your detailed review! And congrats on having a great harvest last year!
      We planted lettuce and carrots from seed last year as well and were also surprised by how easy it was! I was previously intimidated by planting from seed….didn’t think they’d grow under my care ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Which type of peppers did you plant – hot peppers or bell peppers? Which varieties did you plant?

      We used seeds from Burpee. Carrots were the organic “Short and Sweet” variety (photo below) and we tried 2 lettuce varieties – “Green Ice” and “Mesclun Mix”. All grew very easily! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Regards,
      Olli

    • Olli

      Hi Dragonkist,
      Thanks for your detailed review! And congrats on having a great harvest last year!
      We planted lettuce and carrots from seed last year as well and were also surprised by how easy it was! I was previously intimidated by planting from seed….didn’t think they’d grow under my care ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Which type of peppers did you plant – hot peppers or bell peppers? Which varieties did you plant?

      We used seeds from Burpee. Carrots were the organic “Short and Sweet” variety (photo below) and we tried 2 lettuce varieties – “Green Ice” and “Mesclun Mix”. All grew very easily! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Regards,
      Olli

      • Dragonkist

        Olli,
        I planted heirloom non-GMO varieties from SeedsNow.com. The peppers were a bell variety and the carrots were an old French variety called Nantes. Both produced very large vegetables and I swear every carrot seed I planted around the pepper plants grew and grew very well. That said, I have been gardening for sixty years, so I should know what I’m doing by now. ๐Ÿ˜‰ This year I have chosen a great number of other varieties to grow, as variety is the spice of life and one never knows when one may fall in love with something new. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Just remember, a seed’s only job in life is to grow. You just have to provide the right conditions. ๐Ÿ™‚
        Dragonkist

        • Olli

          hi Dragonkist,
          I haven’t tried planting bell peppers from seed but I’d like to. Your success is very encouraging and I feel compelled to try it now:) We too bought a few of these whiskey planters and I have an empty one waiting to be planted. I don’t have the years of experience you have though. I’m merely a novice gardener who’s trying to get over the “fear” of growing from seed ๐Ÿ˜‰ I researched what was easiest to grow and lettuce and carrots were on the list so I tried them and was really excited when the seedlings emerged. I also tried zinnias and marigolds (again, because they’re supposed to be easy) and they grew too ๐Ÿ™‚
          Happy Spring!
          Olli

          • Dragonkist

            Depending on your climate, I’d advise planting pepper seeds in the house first (I let mine get to at least 6 inches tall,) then transplant one plant to the center of each planter that has been drilled for drainage, filled with a good potting mix and watered thoroughly. Tamp the pepper’s root ball firmly into its hole and add a plant support stake or tomato cage that you will later tie the pepper plant to as it grows. Then, starting 5 to 6 inches from the stem of the baby pepper plant and using very dry hands, set out a series of carrot seeds to surround it, fanning the seeds out to within an inch or so of the outer edge of the planter. Try to space the seeds two to three inches apart from one another, just dropping them onto the top of the wet soil. It’s tedious work and the seeds are tiny, but spacing them carefully like this will save you the painful task of thinning the plants later. Once the carrot seeds are in place on the soil surface, cover them with a thin layer of dry sand (builders or play sand, not beach sand) and spray everything lightly with water, being careful not to disturb the sand. Over the next several days, lightly spray the surface with water again if the soil dries out. If all goes well, your carrots should sprout within a week or two, depending upon variety. They will quickly grow to form a little feathery forest that will shade the soil surrounding your pepper plant. For the rest of the growing season just tug out any tiny weeds that you spy, pick off visible insect pests and water the whole planter when needed.

            Once the peppers are done producing for the season, or after first frost, pull out one carrot and test it for flavor. If the carrot is not bitter, you can pull out the rest of your crop.This is one of the most rewarding and fun times in the garden, so try to share the experience with someone who will enjoy it as much as you do. You’ll not only get a large golden treasure to store in loosely closed plastic bags in your fridge (when harvesting pinchl off the green tops to add to your compost pile,) but homegrown carrots tend to get even sweeter during storage.

            I hope this method of growing peppers and carrots in the same large pot works as well for you as it did for me. Enjoy!

  • Olli

    Thanks for sharing your wealth of knowledge on gardening, Dragonkist! It’s much appreciated ๐Ÿ™‚
    Olli